Monthly Archives: July 2014

One Chat, 11 Minutes, 10 Takeaways…WOW!

Last night I engaged in #titletalk, a chat that occurs (sadly) the last Sunday of each month from 8-9EST on Twitter. I say sadly because this is one of the most POWERFUL chats in the Twittersphere.

To learn more about it, please visit http://titletalk.wikispaces.com/.

You know you’re in a great chat with amazing educators when 11 minutes in, you already have a list of 10 takeaways. A great way to catch up on the chats is to visit https://tagboard.com/ and search #titletalk. Make sure you have googledocs or evernote handy…you’re going to take lots of notes.

The topic was “Launching Back to School Reading” with a grand finale of book recs for the start of the year.

Here are my takeaways:

(mind you, the chat was 60 minutes, so if you do the math…well, there’s a lot)

  • Begin the year with an interest inventory using Google Docs
  • Speed Dating- “What Have You Read” style
  • Book Talks
  • Silent Reading (and conferring)
  • Summer Rdg Door Ideas (Like these…)
  • Sharing book trailers
  • Letter to students before school starts to invite them to help set up classroom library
  • Reading Information Night (for parents)
  • Shelfies (http://www.annhandley.com/2014/01/30/shelfies-like-selfies-but-for-book-nerds/)
  • @theBooksource to log in your class library and begin a new checkout system
  • Global Read Aloud Day: October 6th
  • No reading logs! Reading GOALS.
  • Students interview Parents about their life as a reader and share with class
  • #booksandbagels (sounds like a great way to start a book discussion before school, but why not include FAMILIES???)
  • take roll using book titles…instead of “here” or “present” students say the book/magazine/article they’re reading
  • Adding book recommendations to your email signature (“I am currently reading…”)
  • Have something posted for all to see that shares what you’re currently reading
  • One Tweep shared his weekly morning starter activity for each day: MON: Book Trailer, TUES: Book Talk by Teacher, WED: Book Talk by Student, THURS: Poem, FRI: Reading Logs/(Goal Sheet)
  • And most importantly, this Tweet by THE Donalyn Miller herself: “Grandma’s bookshelf, Barnes & Noble, and the public library–not leveled. Kids need strategies for book selection!”

Here’s some recs for books to start of the beginning of the year:

20660824 182250376609765825377

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How will you kick of literacy in your classroom this year? Please share and add to the list.

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One Chat, 11 Minutes, 10 Takeaways…WOW.

Last night I engaged in #titletalk, a chat that occurs (sadly) the last Sunday of each month from 8-9EST on Twitter. I say sadly because this is one of the most POWERFUL chats in the Twittersphere.

To learn more about it, please visit http://titletalk.wikispaces.com/.

You know you’re in a great chat with amazing educators when 11 minutes in, you already have a list of 10 takeaways. A great way to catch up on the chats is to visit https://tagboard.com/ and search #titletalk. Make sure you have googledocs or evernote handy…you’re going to take lots of notes.

The topic was “Launching Back to School Reading” with a grand finale of book recs for the start of the year.

Here are my takeaways:

(mind you, the chat was 60 minutes, so if you do the math…well, there’s a lot)

  • Begin the year with an interest inventory using Google Docs
  • Speed Dating- “What Have You Read” style
  • Book Talks
  • Silent Reading (and conferring)
  • Summer Rdg Door Ideas (Like these…)
  • Sharing book trailers
  • Letter to students before school starts to invite them to help set up classroom library
  • Reading Information Night (for parents)
  • Shelfies (http://www.annhandley.com/2014/01/30/shelfies-like-selfies-but-for-book-nerds/)
  • @theBooksource to log in your class library and begin a new checkout system
  • Global Read Aloud Day: October 6th
  • No reading logs! Reading GOALS.
  • Students interview Parents about their life as a reader and share with class
  • #booksandbagels (sounds like a great way to start a book discussion before school, but why not include FAMILIES???)
  • take roll using book titles…instead of “here” or “present” students say the book/magazine/article they’re reading
  • Adding book recommendations to your email signature (“I am currently reading…”)
  • Have something posted for all to see that shares what you’re currently reading
  • One Tweep shared his weekly morning starter activity for each day: MON: Book Trailer, TUES: Book Talk by Teacher, WED: Book Talk by Student, THURS: Poem, FRI: Reading Logs/(Goal Sheet)
  • And most importantly, this Tweet by THE Donalyn Miller herself: “Grandma’s bookshelf, Barnes & Noble, and the public library–not leveled. Kids need strategies for book selection!”

Here’s some recs for books to start of the beginning of the year:

20660824 182250376609765825377

1123398818222556180797196399406

173314341610106618349884

How will you kick of literacy in your classroom this year? Please share and add to the list.

Somewhere Under the Rainbow…

 

Fostering and nurturing acceptance in a child is one of the biggest gifts we can give our children. The world is incredibly globalized, and children will cross paths with an individual who is different in one way or another. People from diverse backgrounds can be found in every job field, and a child that is unable to accept differences in others will suffer in the future.

This week, #ptcamp is engaging in colorful conversations about diversity based on the book, Beyond the Bake Sale. Several Voxers in the group have expressed concern about their lack of diversity among race, ethnicity and culture. We understand the importance of teaching acceptance, but how do we teach it in our schools if they are primarily one race?

Here are several brilliant ideas that have been expressed this week:

  •  Joy shared that we should tap into our HS graduates that have attended college.  Invite them back to elementary schools to share what they wish they were taught about diversity.
  • Geniene suggested tapping into children’s own history, going back a couple of generations to see how different they are from their roots.
  • Becky suggested using the term “Different Abilities” rather than “Disabilities”. (Love this!)
  • Several voxers mentioned different levels of diversity instead of simply thinking about race and culture… (socioeconomic, academic, sexual orientation)

My biggest takeaway thus far from my week from the Beyond the Bake Sale discussion:

Embrace your families and commit to building meaningful, authentic relationships with them everyday.

How do you embrace diversity in your home, school, and life?